Chem Quickies

Hello, I'm Isabella. The title of the blog pays homage to my high school chem teacher who would try to make pop quizzes cute by naming them. I thought this name was humorous.

I'm currently enrolled in the undergraduate chemistry program at the University of Chicago. This blog is basically all about chemistry and chemical applications. I encourage you to ask any chemistry questions or problems that you may have, and I will try to find a solution (no pun intended!.. that was awful, sorry.) Mostly notes for tests and things I find interesting (or have to study for)

I also encourage submitting relevant material either serious or not. All of the information on this site is of course not my own research. I will try to site as much as possible. Thanks!
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Nucleation!
Most nucleation processes are physical, rather than chemical, but a few exceptions do exist (e.g. electrochemical nucleation). A good example would be the famous Diet Coke and Mentos eruption. Nucleation normally occurs at nucleation sites on surfaces contacting the liquid or vapor. Suspended particles or minute bubbles also provide nucleation sites. This is called heterogeneous nucleation. Nucleation without preferential nucleation sites is homogeneous nucleation. Homogeneous nucleation occurs spontaneously and randomly, but it requires superheating or supercooling of the medium.
When sugar is supersaturated in water nucleation will occur, allowing sugar molecules to stick together and form large crystal structures.

Nucleation!

Most nucleation processes are physical, rather than chemical, but a few exceptions do exist (e.g. electrochemical nucleation). A good example would be the famous Diet Coke and Mentos eruption. Nucleation normally occurs at nucleation sites on surfaces contacting the liquid or vapor. Suspended particles or minute bubbles also provide nucleation sites. This is called heterogeneous nucleation. Nucleation without preferential nucleation sites is homogeneous nucleation. Homogeneous nucleation occurs spontaneously and randomly, but it requires superheating or supercooling of the medium.

When sugar is supersaturated in water nucleation will occur, allowing sugar molecules to stick together and form large crystal structures.


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